Category: Food

September 21st, 2017|

How Will Climate Change Impact Ocean Health?

Three oceanographers from Lamont-Doherty discuss how changes in ocean temperatures and chemistry impact marine life and food security.

May 8th, 2017|

Study: Overuse of Water Threatens Global Food Supply

A study co-authored by Michael Puma found food security risks for the entire globe hiding in the water use practices of major food producing nations.

March 29th, 2017|

Crop Irrigation Closely Tied to Groundwater Depletion

Michael J. Puma, a Center for Climate and Life Fellow, discusses his new study on groundwater depletion worldwide and the implications for food security.

March 2nd, 2017|

Trump’s Unifying Opportunity: Food Security

Securing the nation’s food supply is a major step toward making the U.S. and the world more resilient in the face of increasing uncertainty.

October 4th, 2016|

Mapping Risks and Building Resilience, From Plot to Plate

Figuring out how the global food system might respond to disturbances will ensure that everyone has safe, reliable access to the food they need.

December 3rd, 2015|

What Is Ocean Acidification & Why Does It Matter?

As excess carbon dioxide is absorbed into the oceans, it is starting to have profound effects on marine life, from oysters to tiny snails at the base of the food chain.

The former site of Sant Roma de Sau as water levels drop in Spain. (Josep Enric/CC-BY-2.0)
November 6th, 2015|

New Drought Atlas Maps 2,000 Years of Climate in Europe

Using tree rings, a new drought atlas maps the reach and severity of dry and wet periods across Europe and the Mediterranean over the past 2,000 years.

A new study projects that much of Ethiopia, Somalia and Djibouti in the Horn of Africa will grow drier as global warming progresses. In northern Ethiopia, herders often already struggle to make a living. (Brian Kahn/IRI)
October 9th, 2015|

Horn of Africa Drying in Sync with Climate

A new study finds that the Horn of Africa is drying at a rate that is both unusual in the context of the past 2,000 years and in step with human-influenced warming.

Changing pollen levels in the sediment of Lake Elsinore indicate that a series of mega-droughts gripped the region thousands of years ago. Photo by Jim Sneddon/CC-BY-2.0
September 22nd, 2015|

Ancient Pollen Points to Mega-Droughts in California Thousands of Years Ago

Ancient pollen is providing new insights into historic droughts in Southern California, including how a series of mega-droughts that changed the ecological landscape.

A research vessel plows through the Southern Ocean, whose rough waters play an outsize role in absorbing carbon dioxide from the air. (Nicolas Metzl, LOCEAN/IPSL Laboratory)
September 10th, 2015|

The Southern Ocean Is Breathing in Carbon Dioxide at a Healthy Rate

Since the late 1980s, the Southern Ocean’s rate of CO2 uptake appeared to have stagnated, alarming scientists. New data shows a recovery.

Morning fog reflects solar radiation in the Amazon River Basin. Photo: Dallas Krentzler/CC-BY-2.0
September 1st, 2015|

Seeing the Amazon’s Future Through the Fog

To understand the impact on the Amazon as global warming produces more intense and frequent droughts, we need to understand its water and carbon cycles.

California drying. (Dominick McPeak)
August 20th, 2015|

Warming Climate is Deepening California Drought

A new study finds that global warming has measurably worsened the ongoing California drought and holds warnings for the future.

Researchers sample a dead tree in northern Mongolia. (Courtesy Nicole Davi)
June 11th, 2015|

Tree Rings Confirm Unprecedented Warming in Central Asia

A new study of tree rings from Mongolia dating back more than 1,000 years confirms that recent warming in central Asia has no parallel in any known record.

Drought map in 2095 under business as usual. (NASA)
February 12th, 2015|

Warming Pushes Western U.S. Toward Driest Period in 1,000 Years

During the second half of the 21st century, the U.S. Southwest and Great Plains will face drought worse than anything seen in times ancient or modern, a new study says.

In northern winter, the Bering Sea, dividing Alaska and Siberia, becomes the most acidic region on earth (in purple) as shown in this February 2005 acidity map in pH scale. Temperate oceans are less acidic. The equatorial Pacific is left blank due to its high variability around El Niño and La Niña events. (Takahashi)
November 7th, 2014|

New Global Maps Detail Human-Caused Ocean Acidification

A team of scientists has published the most comprehensive picture yet of how acidity levels vary across the world’s oceans.