Category: Shelter

October 3rd, 2017|

Mumbai May Be Vulnerable to Future Hurricanes

If a serious cyclone were to strike Mumbai, the results could be catastrophic, says a study underway by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate.

September 6th, 2017|

Video: Climate Change and Hurricane Harvey

Atmospheric scientists Chia-Ying Lee and Adam Sobel explain that climate change didn’t cause Hurricane Harvey, but it likely made the storm worse.

September 5th, 2017|

How Will Scientists Find Out Whether Climate Change Made Hurricane Harvey Worse?

It’s too soon to say there’s a connection, but searching for the fingerprints of climate change shouldn’t take too long.

August 9th, 2017|

Analyzing Winter Storm Risk and Resilience in a Changing Climate

A new study found that the northeastern U.S. is at particular risk for physical and economic effects of climate hazards.

June 12th, 2017|

Adam Sobel: Preparing for the Next Big Storm

Superstorm Sandy was a wake-up call for a lot of people in New York City, including Adam Sobel, who’s spent more than two decades studying the physics of weather and climate.

March 8th, 2017|

Is the Oroville Dam Failure a Climate Change Story?

Atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel takes a look at what’s behind the California dam crisis that forced nearly 200,000 people to evacuate.

November 1st, 2016|

How Far Did Sea Level Rise in the Past?

Figuring out how far sea level rose during past warm periods in Earth’s history starts with a walk on the beach, a keen eye for evidence of ancient shorelines, and a highly accurate GPS system.

October 10th, 2016|

Climate Change Has Doubled Western U.S. Forest Fire Area

A new study says that human-induced climate change has doubled the area affected by forest fires in the U.S. West over the last 30 years.

August 30th, 2016|

How Does the Ocean Drive Weather and Climate Extremes?

Lamont’s Ryan Abernathey and Richard Seager are investigating how processes in the ocean create extreme weather and climate conditions over land.

August 17th, 2016|

As Louisiana Floods, Assessing the Influence of Climate Change

The heavy rains and flooding in Louisiana have been devastating. Can we attribute the severity of it to climate change? How you measure that depends on the questions you ask.

April 5th, 2016|

Surfers Team Up with Columbia to Support Ocean Science

The World Surf League is providing $1.5 million in first-year funding for ocean science at Lamont as part of an innovative new philanthropy called WSL PURE.

Glacier loss. (USGS)
February 24th, 2016|

Climate Change Isn’t Just a 21st Century Problem

Humans have been burning fossil fuels for only about 150 years, yet that has started a cascade of changes that will still be felt 10,000 years from now.

Ryan Abernathey
February 23rd, 2016|

Exploring Ocean Turbulence: Sloan Research Fellow Ryan Abernathey

Mesoscale turbulence is where most of the kinetic energy in the oceans can be found, and it may play powerful roles in the global climate.

February 1st, 2016|

Without the Montreal Protocol, More Intense Tropical Cyclones

Using computer models, scientists compared our expected future with a scenario in which ozone-depleting substances had never been regulated.

December 7th, 2015|

Greenland Glaciers Retreating Faster than Any Time in 9,500 Years

A new study uses sediment cores to track the expansion and retreat of glaciers through time and finds they are more sensitive than realized.

November 28th, 2015|

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory: Milestones in Climate Studies

Much of the modern understanding of climate has been shaped by pioneering studies done at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Satellite image of peat fires in Borneo during 2015 (NASA)
November 19th, 2015|

Peat Fires Choking Southeast Asia Pose New Threat to Global Climate

The Indonesian peat fires that have been choking cities across Southeast Asia are creating more than a local health menace—they’re releasing immense stores of CO2.

Greenland Ice Sheet (NASA-GSFC)
October 13th, 2015|

Tracking Ice Sheets When They Were Smaller than Today

As global temperatures rise, knowing just how far Greenland’s ice sheet shrank in the past could help scientists predict sea level rise in the future.

Sea surface height (color shading) and heat transport in the upper 700 m (arrows) during 2003-2012. (Lee etal, Nature Geoscience, 2015)
May 20th, 2015|

Global Warming’s ‘Missing’ Heat: It May Be in the Indian Ocean

A team of oceanographers says much of the heat trapped in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases is being soaked up and stored by the oceans–at least for now.