Category: Uncategorized

From left, Aaron Putnam, Adam Hudson and Ben Hatchett calculate the exact position of a boulder they’ve sampled above Baboon Lakes in the Sierras of central California. All photos: David Funkhouser
February 15th, 2017|

In High Sierras, Remnants of Ice Age Tell a Tale of Future Climate

How did our climate system behave the last time it warmed up like it’s doing today?

A scientist drills a core from a large coral colony in American Samoa, which is located in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and impacted by the SPCZ zonal events Linsley et al. reconstructed using similar corals from the Makassar Strait. Photo: Brad Linsley
February 9th, 2017|

Indonesian Corals Shed Light on Climate System

A new coral salinity record shows that the most significant hydroclimatic feature in the Southern Hemisphere influences a major Pacific Ocean current.

Horses near Lake Dali, in Inner Mongolia. Scientists studying the lake have concluded that the size of the lake has changed dramatically over the distant past, due to changes in the climate and resulting shifts in the annual monsoon. Photo: Yonaton Goldsmith
February 6th, 2017|

Shifting Monsoon Altered Early Cultures in China, Study Says

Changes in the annual summer monsoon that drops rain onto East Asia likely altered the course of early human cultures in China, say the authors of a new study.

Vetlesen Prize
January 26th, 2017|

Mark Cane, George Philander, Win 2017 Vetlesen Prize

Two scientists who untangled the forces that drive El Niño, the world’s most powerful weather cycle, won the 2017 Vetlesen Prize for achievement in Earth sciences.

Scientists launch a Multiple Opening/Closing Net and Environmental Sensing System (MOCNESS) from the R/V Gould off the West Antarctic Peninsula. Towed behind a research vessel, MOCNESS nets collect specific types of plankton, while sensors affix to the system provide real-time information about the physical properties of the seawater. Photo: Naomi Shelton/LDEO
January 19th, 2017|

Antarctic Scientists Honor Obama by Collecting Climate Data

Polar scientists give Obama a warm farewell by collecting climate data in his name.

African Savanna
January 18th, 2017|

Green Sahara’s Ancient Rainfall Regime Revealed

Rainfall patterns in the Sahara during the six-thousand-year “Green Sahara” period have been revealed by analyzing marine sediments.

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January 13th, 2017|

Tracking How Glaciers Change Over Time

Research by Lamont’s Billy D’Andreas revealed that over the last century, glaciers in Greenland have been retreating quickly — at a rate at least twice as fast as any other time in the past 9,500 years.

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January 9th, 2017|

Henhouse for Rent — Only Foxes Need Apply

Many of President-elect Donald Trump’s cabinet nominations would work to undermine the very things they have been tasked to protect.

The open oceans are acidifying quickly, due to human introduction of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Scientists at the Center for Climate and Life study living plankton and ancient fossils to chart and understand the processes involved. Here, geochemist Bärbel Hönisch collects plankton off the southwestern coast of Puerto Rico. Credit: Steve Doo.
December 16th, 2016|

Climate Change and the Oceans

Lamont geochemist Bärbel Hönisch investigates the role of the ocean and, in particular, the role of marine carbonate chemistry in global climate change.

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Categories: Uncategorized
December 12th, 2016|

New Project to Study Arctic Sea Ice Change

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation announced a $3.7 million grant to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory for research on changing patterns of sea ice in the Alaskan Arctic.

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December 9th, 2016|

2017 Center for Climate and Life Fellows Announced

The four new Fellows are a diverse group of junior and mid-career scientists with research interests spanning a range of climate topics and regions.

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December 7th, 2016|

Most of Greenland Ice Melted to Bedrock in Recent Geologic Past

Evidence buried in Greenland’s bedrock shows that the Greenland Ice Sheet nearly disappeared for an extended time in the last million years or so.

The first of six ALAMO floats parachutes into the Ross Sea off Antarctica to begin profiling the water. Their mission is to check for areas where warmer than normal water could put the Ross Ice Shelf at risk. Photo: Tej Dhakal/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
December 2nd, 2016|

Antarctica Has a New Explorer Testing the Water Along a Critical Ice Shelf

Floats deployed by Lamont scientists will find areas where warmer than normal water could put the Ross Ice Shelf at risk.

Feeding the world’s growing population is a challenge, one that is compounded by global warming as extreme heat and drought impact crop yields and food supplies. Image: Forrest Cavale
November 17th, 2016|

The Real Climate Catastrophe

Earth’s climate is changing very rapidly, with severe impacts looming on the horizon, yet we continue to stand around instead of finding and implementing solutions to the challenges posed by global warming.

Trees grow very slowly in northern Alaska; this one that Boelman is examining is about 15 years old. Photo: Kevin Krajick
November 16th, 2016|

Where Trees Meet Tundra, Decoding Signals of Climate Change

In the far north, climate is warming two to three times faster than the global average. How will these changes affect tundra and boreal forests?

Microbes
November 11th, 2016|

Understanding Microbes and Global Warming

Sonya Dyhrman studies marine microbes and the role they play in producing oxygen, capturing carbon dioxide, and fueling the marine food web.

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November 4th, 2016|

Clues to Past Climate

A close-up of a Litsea calicarioides leaf’s stomata, through which leaves take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen, speaks to atmospheric CO2 levels 23 million years ago.

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November 1st, 2016|

How Far Did Sea Level Rise in the Past?

Figuring out how far sea level rose during past warm periods in Earth’s history starts with a walk on the beach, a keen eye for evidence of ancient shorelines, and a highly accurate GPS system.

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October 31st, 2016|

Monitoring Coastal Erosion in West Africa

Geologist Alessio Rovere and Trinity Mensah-Senoo walk along a beach in Ghana gathering data that will be used to monitor coastal erosion.

Peter Kelemen
October 31st, 2016|

Turning CO2 to Stone to Combat Climate Change

Lamont scientists have developed ways to relatively quickly turn carbon dioxide captured from power plants to a solid for long-term storage.

Park Williams at Open House
October 28th, 2016|

The Impact of Human-caused Warming on Drought and Fire

Park Williams explains the influence of climate change on droughts and wildfires in the western United States.

Brad Sampling
October 14th, 2016|

Pacific Corals and Climate

In diving expeditions to several Pacific Ocean islands, Lamont paleoclimatologist Brad Linsley has collected cores that hold up to 500 years’ worth of climate information.

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October 13th, 2016|

Historic Shrinking of Antarctic Ice Sheet Linked to CO2 Spike

23 million years ago, the Antarctic ice sheet was shrinking quickly. A new study by Lamont scientists sheds light on the cause of that ancient melt.

Mo Raymo
October 7th, 2016|

Sea Change in South Africa

Lamont marine geologist and paleoclimatologist Maureen Raymo studies ancient shorelines to understand how high seas rose in the past, and how high they might climb in the future.

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October 5th, 2016|

Climate and Life at the Lamont Open House

Follow your curiosity and explore Earth science with us with on Saturday, October 8 at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Open House.

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September 30th, 2016|

Songbirds and Climate Change

Ecosystem ecologist Natalie Boelman is studying the effects of climate change on the relationships among migratory songbirds, plants and insects in Alaska.

2016 Climate and Life Fellow Park Williams uses an increment borer to extract a core from a tree in the Ozark Mountains. Photo: Kevin Krajick
Categories: Uncategorized
September 30th, 2016|

Request for Proposals: Center for Climate and Life Fellows

The Center for Climate and Life will support three new fellows to conduct innovative, impactful research relevant to our mission.

Participants in Students on Ice listen to Lamont climate scientist Maureen Raymo discuss climate change at the foot of Greenland's Illissaat Icefjord. (Image: Martin Lipman/Students on Ice)
September 15th, 2016|

Facing Rapid Change in the Arctic

An expedition to the Canadian Arctic and west coast of Greenland is a moving and motivating experience for leading climate scientist Maureen Raymo.

Snowfall is expected to increase over Antarctica as temperatures warm, helping to partially offset sea-level rise. Photo: Michael Stukel
August 24th, 2016|

By Mid-Century, More Antarctic Snowfall May Partially Offset Sea-Level Rise

In a new study, Lamont’s Michael Previdi and Lorenzo Polvani found that the effect of rising temperatures on snowfall in Antarctica has so far been overshadowed by the frozen continent’s large natural climate variability.

Kelly Slater
Categories: Uncategorized
August 11th, 2016|

Surf with a Legend and Support Ocean Science Research

Join pro-surfing legend Kelly Slater at his Surf Ranch as part of a new fundraising campaign that benefits WSL PURE and the Center for Climate and Life.

August 9th, 2016|

A Migration Mystery

Ecologist Natalie Boelman is part of a multi-year field campaign to understand the impacts of climate change in Alaska and western Canada.

Intern Addison Bent at work in the Lamont Core Repository. Credit Rebecca Fowler
July 26th, 2016|

A Summer of Hands-on, Minds-On Science

A new internship program enables high school students to gain hands-on research experience while working alongside Climate and Life scientists.

NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Super Typhoon Nepartak approaching Taiwan on July 7, 2016. Image: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response/Jeff Schmaltz
July 14th, 2016|

Tropical Cyclones on Track to Grow More Intense as Temperatures Rise

Powerful tropical cyclones like the super typhoon that lashed Taiwan in July are expected to become even stronger as the planet warms.

Adélie penguins
July 10th, 2016|

Penguins: Climate’s Canaries in the Coal Mine

Changes on the West Antarctic Peninsula are showing in the numbers and species of marine wildlife, particularly the native Adélie penguin.

Ocean overturning circulation illustrated. Courtesy of co-author Lynne Talley.
June 27th, 2016|

Wind-Blown Antarctic Sea Ice Helps Drive Ocean Circulation

A new study shows how Antarctic sea ice migration may be more important for the global ocean circulation than anyone realized.

The CarbFix test site in Iceland where gases from a geothermal power plant are pumped underground and converted into minerals by reacting with basalt stone. Credit: Martin Stute
June 16th, 2016|

Putting CO2 Away for Good by Turning it Into Stone

In a recently published study, scientists demonstrated that two years after injecting CO2 underground at a pilot test site in Iceland, almost all of it has been converted into minerals.

A projectile point, age and makers unknown, on the ground in northwest Kenya, where conditions are now more arid than in the past. Photo: Kevin Krajick
June 14th, 2016|

New Support for Human Evolution in Grasslands

A new study supplies the longest and most complete record of ancient plant life in much of what is now Ethiopia and Kenya, the assumed birthplace of humanity.

Peter deMenocal
May 19th, 2016|

Is It The End Of The World As We Know It?

In this episode of the Huffington Post’s “Talk Nerdy To Me,” Center for Climate and Life Director Peter de Menocal discusses climate change and the Anthropocene.

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May 17th, 2016|

Iron Fertilization Won’t Work in Equatorial Pacific, Study Suggests

Earth’s own large-scale iron fertilization experiments over 500,000 years show adding iron to the equatorial Pacific surface has little effect.

Peter deMenocal
Categories: Uncategorized
May 14th, 2016|

Talks@Columbia: Why Climate Matters

Center for Climate and Life director Peter deMenocal discusses how climate is changing today, why it is changing and how this impacts people and the global economy.

Maureen Raymo
May 4th, 2016|

Ice & Sea-Level Scientist Maureen Raymo Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Maureen Raymo, a marine geologist and paleoceanographer whose name is connected with key theories about how ice ages wax and wane and how sea levels change, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

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March 15th, 2016|

How Will a Shifting Climate Change U.S. Forests?

The Ozarks are some of the country’s most productive forests. They also sit in a warming “hole”, where temperature rise hasn’t yet taken hold.

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March 5th, 2016|

Bleach Patrol: Turning Surfers into Scientists for Coral Reefs

A new citizen science project turns surfers and other ocean enthusiasts into the eyes of scientists studying the world’s coral reefs.

Ryan Abernathey
February 23rd, 2016|

Exploring Ocean Turbulence: Sloan Research Fellow Ryan Abernathey

Mesoscale turbulence is where most of the kinetic energy in the oceans can be found, and it may play powerful roles in the global climate.

Park Williams coring a tree in the Gondar region of Ethiopia. Image: Marcin Koprowski
January 22nd, 2016|

Center for Climate & Life Announces 2016 Fellows

One scientist is focusing on food security and climate shocks. The other is exploring the influence of climate change on droughts and wildfires.

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December 3rd, 2015|

What Is Ocean Acidification & Why Does It Matter?

As excess carbon dioxide is absorbed into the oceans, it is starting to have profound effects on marine life, from oysters to tiny snails at the base of the food chain.

Satellite image of peat fires in Borneo during 2015 (NASA)
November 19th, 2015|

Peat Fires Choking Southeast Asia Pose New Threat to Global Climate

The Indonesian peat fires that have been choking cities across Southeast Asia are creating more than a local health menace—they’re releasing immense stores of CO2.

Sea surface height (color shading) and heat transport in the upper 700 m (arrows) during 2003-2012. (Lee etal, Nature Geoscience, 2015)
May 20th, 2015|

Global Warming’s ‘Missing’ Heat: It May Be in the Indian Ocean

A team of oceanographers says much of the heat trapped in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases is being soaked up and stored by the oceans–at least for now.