Category: Uncategorized

August 18th, 2017|

Study Finds Most of East Antarctic Ice Sheet Should Remain Stable

A new study from Lamont-Doherty and Indiana University researchers validates that the East Antarctic ice sheet should remain stable even if the western ice sheet melts.

August 13th, 2017|

How Will Climate Change Impact Shelter?

Robin Bell, Radley Horton, and Adam Sobel explain how their research helps make communities more resilient to extreme weather and sea level rise.

July 19th, 2017|

Developing Carbon Management Solutions

David Goldberg and Peter Kelemen discuss carbon capture and storage, and how it can make the energy sector, and society, more resilient to climate change.

July 13th, 2017|

Surging Heat May Limit Aircraft Takeoffs Globally

Rising temperatures due to global warming will make it harder for many aircraft around the world to take off in coming decades, says a new study.

July 12th, 2017|

One of Largest Icebergs Ever Breaks off Antarctica

It’s not unusual for ice shelves to calve, many in the climate community fear that the breaking of Larsen C may be a signal of other events to come.

July 11th, 2017|

Columbia University Announces Columbia Science Commits

A new initiative accelerates Columbia’s commitment to advance knowledge and solve some of the greatest scientific challenges facing the world today.

Categories: Uncategorized
July 6th, 2017|

Warming Climate Could Abruptly Increase Rain in Africa’s Sahel

Scientists have found evidence for a possible abrupt change in the Sahel, a region long characterized by aridity and political instability.

June 26th, 2017|

Christine McCarthy: A Cheerleader for the Physics of Ice

Research by geophysicist Christine McCarthy reveals how glaciers move, what makes them speed up, and how they are contributing to sea level rise as the climate warms.

June 23rd, 2017|

Announcing the 2017 Center for Climate and Life Senior Fellows

The Center has awarded nearly $1 million to four scientists whose research will improve understanding of how climate change impacts the essentials of human sustainability.

June 19th, 2017|

How Drones are Advancing Scientific Research

Once scientists could only observe Earth from above by using manned aircraft or satellites. Today they’re using drones to expand their research as never before.

June 8th, 2017|

I Don’t Have Time for Despair. I’m Too Busy Doing Science.

Self-pity is a luxury we can’t afford right now. We need science to inform our actions in a fast-changing world, and we need to keep asking questions.

June 1st, 2017|

How Will Climate Change Impact Water Resources?

Richard Seager and Park Williams discuss how water will be affected by warmer temperatures, and how their research increases understanding of these issues.

June 1st, 2017|

Meltwater Lakes Existed Under Antarctic Ice

During the last glacial period, there were lakes under Antarctica’s ice sheet, which may have accelerated the retreat of glaciers in the past.

May 30th, 2017|

Richard Seager Sees Hand of Climate Change in Drought

Seager, a climate scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, discusses his research on drought in the North American Southwest.

May 25th, 2017|

Lamont Scientists Are Focus of New York Times Series

Last winter, reporters from The New York Times joined Lamont scientists as they flew their mission of discovery over Antarctica.

May 23rd, 2017|

The Earth Cannot Be Silenced: Support Our Climate Research

We’re working to understand and predict climate change variability and its impacts — and we’re devoted to applying this knowledge to solutions.

May 22nd, 2017|

Reduced U.S. Air Pollution Will Boost Rainfall in Africa’s Sahel, Says Study

The health and environmental benefits of U.S. clean air policies extend to global climate.

May 19th, 2017|

Photo Essay: Coring Arctic Lakes to Study Vikings

Billy D’Andrea is investigating the relationship between environmental change and characteristics of early settlements in Arctic Norway.

May 18th, 2017|

Researchers Model Differences in East Coast Sea Level Rise

New research offers the first comprehensive model for understanding differences in sea level rise along North America’s East Coast.

May 8th, 2017|

Study: Overuse of Water Threatens Global Food Supply

A study co-authored by Michael Puma found food security risks for the entire globe hiding in the water use practices of major food producing nations.

May 8th, 2017|

The Glaciers are Going: Why This Matters

The melting of glaciers will affect drinking water supplies, water needed to grow food and supply energy, as well as global sea levels.

April 27th, 2017|

The Near-term Impacts of Climate Change on Investors

On May 2, 2017, Lamont-Doherty and the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School co-host a Social Enterprise Leadership Forum.

April 19th, 2017|

Study Finds Water Streaming Across Antarctica

The widespread presence of seasonally flowing streams signals that the ice may be more vulnerable to melting than previously thought.

Categories: Uncategorized
April 19th, 2017|

Visit the Center for Climate and Life at Earth Day Texas

Learn more about our research and initiatives at Earth Day Texas, the largest Earth Day celebration in the world, April 21-23, 2017 in Dallas.

April 17th, 2017|

Finding Changing Landscapes Through a Microscope

Pratigya Polissar, a paleoclimatologist and Center for Climate and Life Fellow, talks about his research, and what inspired him to go into his field.

March 29th, 2017|

Crop Irrigation Closely Tied to Groundwater Depletion

Michael J. Puma, a Center for Climate and Life Fellow, discusses his new study on groundwater depletion worldwide and the implications for food security.

March 28th, 2017|

How Do Higher CO2 Levels Impact Marine Life?

With support from WSL PURE, Center scientists are examining the impacts of ocean warming and acidification on calcifying plankton.

March 27th, 2017|

Thunderstorms Pose as Much Property Risk as Hurricanes

A report by Columbia University and Willis Re says that the average annual loss from severe convective storms was $11.23 billion for the period 2003-2015.

March 24th, 2017|

Park Williams Discovers History and Science in a Tree Ring

Center for Climate and Life Fellow Park Williams studies trees and climate. In this video he talks about his research, why it’s important, and what inspires him.

February 15th, 2017|

In High Sierras, Remnants of Ice Age Tell a Tale of Future Climate

How did our climate system behave the last time it warmed up like it’s doing today?

February 9th, 2017|

Indonesian Corals Shed Light on Climate System

A new coral salinity record shows that the most significant hydroclimatic feature in the Southern Hemisphere influences a major Pacific Ocean current.

February 6th, 2017|

Shifting Monsoon Altered Early Cultures in China, Study Says

Changes in the annual summer monsoon that drops rain onto East Asia likely altered the course of early human cultures in China, say the authors of a new study.

January 26th, 2017|

Mark Cane, George Philander, Win 2017 Vetlesen Prize

Two scientists who untangled the forces that drive El Niño, the world’s most powerful weather cycle, won the 2017 Vetlesen Prize for achievement in Earth sciences.

January 19th, 2017|

Antarctic Scientists Honor Obama by Collecting Climate Data

Polar scientists give Obama a warm farewell by collecting climate data in his name.

January 18th, 2017|

Green Sahara’s Ancient Rainfall Regime Revealed

Rainfall patterns in the Sahara during the six-thousand-year “Green Sahara” period have been revealed by analyzing marine sediments.

January 13th, 2017|

Tracking How Glaciers Change Over Time

Research by Lamont’s Billy D’Andreas revealed that over the last century, glaciers in Greenland have been retreating quickly — at a rate at least twice as fast as any other time in the past 9,500 years.

January 9th, 2017|

Henhouse for Rent — Only Foxes Need Apply

Many of President-elect Donald Trump’s cabinet nominations would work to undermine the very things they have been tasked to protect.

December 16th, 2016|

Climate Change and the Oceans

Lamont geochemist Bärbel Hönisch investigates the role of the ocean and, in particular, the role of marine carbonate chemistry in global climate change.

Categories: Uncategorized
December 12th, 2016|

New Project to Study Arctic Sea Ice Change

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation announced a $3.7 million grant to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory for research on changing patterns of sea ice in the Alaskan Arctic.

December 9th, 2016|

2017 Center for Climate and Life Fellows Announced

The four new Fellows are a diverse group of junior and mid-career scientists with research interests spanning a range of climate topics and regions.

December 7th, 2016|

Most of Greenland Ice Melted to Bedrock in Recent Geologic Past

Evidence buried in Greenland’s bedrock shows that the Greenland Ice Sheet nearly disappeared for an extended time in the last million years or so.

December 2nd, 2016|

Antarctica Has a New Explorer Testing the Water Along a Critical Ice Shelf

Floats deployed by Lamont scientists will find areas where warmer than normal water could put the Ross Ice Shelf at risk.

November 17th, 2016|

The Real Climate Catastrophe

Earth’s climate is changing very rapidly, with severe impacts looming on the horizon, yet we continue to stand around instead of finding and implementing solutions to the challenges posed by global warming.

November 16th, 2016|

Where Trees Meet Tundra, Decoding Signals of Climate Change

In the far north, climate is warming two to three times faster than the global average. How will these changes affect tundra and boreal forests?

November 11th, 2016|

Understanding Microbes and Global Warming

Sonya Dyhrman studies marine microbes and the role they play in producing oxygen, capturing carbon dioxide, and fueling the marine food web.

November 4th, 2016|

Clues to Past Climate

A close-up of a Litsea calicarioides leaf’s stomata, through which leaves take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen, speaks to atmospheric CO2 levels 23 million years ago.

November 1st, 2016|

How Far Did Sea Level Rise in the Past?

Figuring out how far sea level rose during past warm periods in Earth’s history starts with a walk on the beach, a keen eye for evidence of ancient shorelines, and a highly accurate GPS system.

October 31st, 2016|

Monitoring Coastal Erosion in West Africa

Geologist Alessio Rovere and Trinity Mensah-Senoo walk along a beach in Ghana gathering data that will be used to monitor coastal erosion.

October 31st, 2016|

Turning CO2 to Stone to Combat Climate Change

Lamont scientists have developed ways to relatively quickly turn carbon dioxide captured from power plants to a solid for long-term storage.

October 28th, 2016|

The Impact of Human-caused Warming on Drought and Fire

Park Williams explains the influence of climate change on droughts and wildfires in the western United States.

October 14th, 2016|

Pacific Corals and Climate

In diving expeditions to several Pacific Ocean islands, Lamont paleoclimatologist Brad Linsley has collected cores that hold up to 500 years’ worth of climate information.

October 13th, 2016|

Historic Shrinking of Antarctic Ice Sheet Linked to CO2 Spike

23 million years ago, the Antarctic ice sheet was shrinking quickly. A new study by Lamont scientists sheds light on the cause of that ancient melt.

October 7th, 2016|

Sea Change in South Africa

Lamont marine geologist and paleoclimatologist Maureen Raymo studies ancient shorelines to understand how high seas rose in the past, and how high they might climb in the future.

October 5th, 2016|

Climate and Life at the Lamont Open House

Follow your curiosity and explore Earth science with us with on Saturday, October 8 at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Open House.

September 30th, 2016|

Songbirds and Climate Change

Ecosystem ecologist Natalie Boelman is studying the effects of climate change on the relationships among migratory songbirds, plants and insects in Alaska.

Categories: Uncategorized
September 30th, 2016|

Request for Proposals: Center for Climate and Life Fellows

The Center for Climate and Life will support three new fellows to conduct innovative, impactful research relevant to our mission.

September 15th, 2016|

Facing Rapid Change in the Arctic

An expedition to the Canadian Arctic and west coast of Greenland is a moving and motivating experience for leading climate scientist Maureen Raymo.

August 24th, 2016|

By Mid-Century, More Antarctic Snowfall May Partially Offset Sea-Level Rise

In a new study, Lamont’s Michael Previdi and Lorenzo Polvani found that the effect of rising temperatures on snowfall in Antarctica has so far been overshadowed by the frozen continent’s large natural climate variability.

Categories: Uncategorized
August 11th, 2016|

Surf with a Legend and Support Ocean Science Research

Join pro-surfing legend Kelly Slater at his Surf Ranch as part of a new fundraising campaign that benefits WSL PURE and the Center for Climate and Life.

August 9th, 2016|

A Migration Mystery

Ecologist Natalie Boelman is part of a multi-year field campaign to understand the impacts of climate change in Alaska and western Canada.

July 26th, 2016|

A Summer of Hands-on, Minds-On Science

A new internship program enables high school students to gain hands-on research experience while working alongside Climate and Life scientists.

July 14th, 2016|

Tropical Cyclones on Track to Grow More Intense as Temperatures Rise

Powerful tropical cyclones like the super typhoon that lashed Taiwan in July are expected to become even stronger as the planet warms.

July 10th, 2016|

Penguins: Climate’s Canaries in the Coal Mine

Changes on the West Antarctic Peninsula are showing in the numbers and species of marine wildlife, particularly the native Adélie penguin.

June 27th, 2016|

Wind-Blown Antarctic Sea Ice Helps Drive Ocean Circulation

A new study shows how Antarctic sea ice migration may be more important for the global ocean circulation than anyone realized.

June 16th, 2016|

Putting CO2 Away for Good by Turning it Into Stone

In a recently published study, scientists demonstrated that two years after injecting CO2 underground at a pilot test site in Iceland, almost all of it has been converted into minerals.

June 14th, 2016|

New Support for Human Evolution in Grasslands

A new study supplies the longest and most complete record of ancient plant life in much of what is now Ethiopia and Kenya, the assumed birthplace of humanity.

May 19th, 2016|

Is It The End Of The World As We Know It?

In this episode of the Huffington Post’s “Talk Nerdy To Me,” Center for Climate and Life Director Peter de Menocal discusses climate change and the Anthropocene.

May 17th, 2016|

Iron Fertilization Won’t Work in Equatorial Pacific, Study Suggests

Earth’s own large-scale iron fertilization experiments over 500,000 years show adding iron to the equatorial Pacific surface has little effect.

Categories: Uncategorized
May 14th, 2016|

Talks@Columbia: Why Climate Matters

Center for Climate and Life director Peter deMenocal discusses how climate is changing today, why it is changing and how this impacts people and the global economy.

May 4th, 2016|

Ice & Sea-Level Scientist Maureen Raymo Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Maureen Raymo, a marine geologist and paleoceanographer whose name is connected with key theories about how ice ages wax and wane and how sea levels change, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

March 15th, 2016|

How Will a Shifting Climate Change U.S. Forests?

The Ozarks are some of the country’s most productive forests. They also sit in a warming “hole”, where temperature rise hasn’t yet taken hold.

March 5th, 2016|

Bleach Patrol: Turning Surfers into Scientists for Coral Reefs

A new citizen science project turns surfers and other ocean enthusiasts into the eyes of scientists studying the world’s coral reefs.

Ryan Abernathey
February 23rd, 2016|

Exploring Ocean Turbulence: Sloan Research Fellow Ryan Abernathey

Mesoscale turbulence is where most of the kinetic energy in the oceans can be found, and it may play powerful roles in the global climate.

January 22nd, 2016|

Center for Climate & Life Announces 2016 Fellows

One scientist is focusing on food security and climate shocks. The other is exploring the influence of climate change on droughts and wildfires.

December 3rd, 2015|

What Is Ocean Acidification & Why Does It Matter?

As excess carbon dioxide is absorbed into the oceans, it is starting to have profound effects on marine life, from oysters to tiny snails at the base of the food chain.

Satellite image of peat fires in Borneo during 2015 (NASA)
November 19th, 2015|

Peat Fires Choking Southeast Asia Pose New Threat to Global Climate

The Indonesian peat fires that have been choking cities across Southeast Asia are creating more than a local health menace—they’re releasing immense stores of CO2.

Sea surface height (color shading) and heat transport in the upper 700 m (arrows) during 2003-2012. (Lee etal, Nature Geoscience, 2015)
May 20th, 2015|

Global Warming’s ‘Missing’ Heat: It May Be in the Indian Ocean

A team of oceanographers says much of the heat trapped in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases is being soaked up and stored by the oceans–at least for now.