Tag: climate change

May 25th, 2017|

Lamont Scientists Are Focus of NY Times Series

Last winter, reporters from The New York Times joined Lamont scientists as they flew their mission of discovery over Antarctica.

May 23rd, 2017|

New Video: The Earth Cannot Be Silenced

We’re urgently working to understand and better predict climate change variability and its impacts — and we’re devoted to applying our understanding to real world solutions.

May 18th, 2017|

Researchers Model Differences in East Coast Sea Level Rise

New research offers the first comprehensive model for understanding differences in sea level rise along North America’s East Coast.

May 8th, 2017|

The Glaciers are Going: Why This Matters

The melting of glaciers will affect drinking water supplies, water needed to grow food and supply energy, as well as global sea levels.

April 27th, 2017|

The Near-term Impacts of Climate Change on Investors

On May 2, 2017, Lamont-Doherty and the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School co-host a Social Enterprise Leadership Forum.

April 19th, 2017|

Study Finds Water Streaming Across Antarctica

The widespread presence of seasonally flowing streams signals that the ice may be more vulnerable to melting than previously thought.

March 8th, 2017|

Is the Oroville Dam Failure a Climate Change Story?

Atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel takes a look at what’s behind the California dam crisis that forced nearly 200,000 people to evacuate.

February 15th, 2017|

In High Sierras, Remnants of Ice Age Tell a Tale of Future Climate

How did our climate system behave the last time it warmed up like it’s doing today?

February 6th, 2017|

Shifting Monsoon Altered Early Cultures in China, Study Says

Changes in the annual summer monsoon that drops rain onto East Asia likely altered the course of early human cultures in China, say the authors of a new study.

January 19th, 2017|

Antarctic Scientists Honor Obama by Collecting Climate Data

Polar scientists give Obama a warm farewell by collecting climate data in his name.

January 13th, 2017|

Tracking How Glaciers Change Over Time

Research by Lamont’s Billy D’Andreas revealed that over the last century, glaciers in Greenland have been retreating quickly — at a rate at least twice as fast as any other time in the past 9,500 years.

December 16th, 2016|

Climate Change and the Oceans

Lamont geochemist Bärbel Hönisch investigates the role of the ocean and, in particular, the role of marine carbonate chemistry in global climate change.

November 16th, 2016|

Where Trees Meet Tundra, Decoding Signals of Climate Change

In the far north, climate is warming two to three times faster than the global average. How will these changes affect tundra and boreal forests?

November 11th, 2016|

Understanding Microbes and Global Warming

Sonya Dyhrman studies marine microbes and the role they play in producing oxygen, capturing carbon dioxide, and fueling the marine food web.

October 10th, 2016|

Climate Change Has Doubled Western U.S. Forest Fire Area

A new study says that human-induced climate change has doubled the area affected by forest fires in the U.S. West over the last 30 years.

October 6th, 2016|

Rising Temperatures Load the Dice for Megadrought Risk

As the Southwestern U.S. grows hotter, the risk of long-lasting megadroughts rises, passing 90% this century if greenhouse gas emissions continue at their current pace.

September 30th, 2016|

Songbirds and Climate Change

Ecosystem ecologist Natalie Boelman is studying the effects of climate change on the relationships among migratory songbirds, plants and insects in Alaska.

September 15th, 2016|

Facing Rapid Change in the Arctic

An expedition to the Canadian Arctic and west coast of Greenland is a moving and motivating experience for leading climate scientist Maureen Raymo.

August 18th, 2016|

Drought and Fire Activity: What’s Climate Change Got to Do with It?

Scientist Park Williams, recipient of a Climate and Life Fellowship, is examining the influence of climate change on droughts and wildfires.

August 9th, 2016|

A Migration Mystery

Ecologist Natalie Boelman is part of a multi-year field campaign to understand the impacts of climate change in Alaska and western Canada.

May 19th, 2016|

Is It The End Of The World As We Know It?

In this episode of the Huffington Post’s “Talk Nerdy To Me,” Center for Climate and Life Director Peter de Menocal discusses climate change and the Anthropocene.

May 17th, 2016|

Iron Fertilization Won’t Work in Equatorial Pacific, Study Suggests

Earth’s own large-scale iron fertilization experiments over 500,000 years show adding iron to the equatorial Pacific surface has little effect.

Glacier loss. (USGS)
February 24th, 2016|

Climate Change Isn’t Just a 21st Century Problem

Humans have been burning fossil fuels for only about 150 years, yet that has started a cascade of changes that will still be felt 10,000 years from now.

February 1st, 2016|

Without the Montreal Protocol, More Intense Tropical Cyclones

Using computer models, scientists compared our expected future with a scenario in which ozone-depleting substances had never been regulated.

January 22nd, 2016|

Center for Climate & Life Announces 2016 Fellows

One scientist is focusing on food security and climate shocks. The other is exploring the influence of climate change on droughts and wildfires.

November 28th, 2015|

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory: Milestones in Climate Studies

Much of the modern understanding of climate has been shaped by pioneering studies done at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Satellite image of peat fires in Borneo during 2015 (NASA)
November 19th, 2015|

Peat Fires Choking Southeast Asia Pose New Threat to Global Climate

The Indonesian peat fires that have been choking cities across Southeast Asia are creating more than a local health menace—they’re releasing immense stores of CO2.

Snowpack in the Lesser Caucasus mountains of northeastern Turkey. The lowlands depend on snowmelt, which is projected to decline due to global warming. (Courtesy of Dario Martin-Benito).
November 12th, 2015|

Declining Snowpacks May Cut Many Nations’ Water

Scientists have identified 32 water basins where loss of snowpack as temperatures warm is putting the water supplies of large populations at risk.

The former site of Sant Roma de Sau as water levels drop in Spain. (Josep Enric/CC-BY-2.0)
November 6th, 2015|

New Drought Atlas Maps 2,000 Years of Climate in Europe

Using tree rings, a new drought atlas maps the reach and severity of dry and wet periods across Europe and the Mediterranean over the past 2,000 years.

A new study projects that much of Ethiopia, Somalia and Djibouti in the Horn of Africa will grow drier as global warming progresses. In northern Ethiopia, herders often already struggle to make a living. (Brian Kahn/IRI)
October 9th, 2015|

Horn of Africa Drying in Sync with Climate

A new study finds that the Horn of Africa is drying at a rate that is both unusual in the context of the past 2,000 years and in step with human-influenced warming.

Changing pollen levels in the sediment of Lake Elsinore indicate that a series of mega-droughts gripped the region thousands of years ago. Photo by Jim Sneddon/CC-BY-2.0
September 22nd, 2015|

Ancient Pollen Points to Mega-Droughts in California Thousands of Years Ago

Ancient pollen is providing new insights into historic droughts in Southern California, including how a series of mega-droughts that changed the ecological landscape.

A research vessel plows through the Southern Ocean, whose rough waters play an outsize role in absorbing carbon dioxide from the air. (Nicolas Metzl, LOCEAN/IPSL Laboratory)
September 10th, 2015|

The Southern Ocean Is Breathing in Carbon Dioxide at a Healthy Rate

Since the late 1980s, the Southern Ocean’s rate of CO2 uptake appeared to have stagnated, alarming scientists. New data shows a recovery.

Morning fog reflects solar radiation in the Amazon River Basin. Photo: Dallas Krentzler/CC-BY-2.0
September 1st, 2015|

Seeing the Amazon’s Future Through the Fog

To understand the impact on the Amazon as global warming produces more intense and frequent droughts, we need to understand its water and carbon cycles.

California drying. (Dominick McPeak)
August 20th, 2015|

Warming Climate is Deepening California Drought

A new study finds that global warming has measurably worsened the ongoing California drought and holds warnings for the future.

Researchers sample a dead tree in northern Mongolia. (Courtesy Nicole Davi)
June 11th, 2015|

Tree Rings Confirm Unprecedented Warming in Central Asia

A new study of tree rings from Mongolia dating back more than 1,000 years confirms that recent warming in central Asia has no parallel in any known record.

Sea surface height (color shading) and heat transport in the upper 700 m (arrows) during 2003-2012. (Lee etal, Nature Geoscience, 2015)
May 20th, 2015|

Global Warming’s ‘Missing’ Heat: It May Be in the Indian Ocean

A team of oceanographers says much of the heat trapped in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases is being soaked up and stored by the oceans–at least for now.

Drought map in 2095 under business as usual. (NASA)
February 12th, 2015|

Warming Pushes Western U.S. Toward Driest Period in 1,000 Years

During the second half of the 21st century, the U.S. Southwest and Great Plains will face drought worse than anything seen in times ancient or modern, a new study says.

In northern winter, the Bering Sea, dividing Alaska and Siberia, becomes the most acidic region on earth (in purple) as shown in this February 2005 acidity map in pH scale. Temperate oceans are less acidic. The equatorial Pacific is left blank due to its high variability around El Niño and La Niña events. (Takahashi)
November 7th, 2014|

New Global Maps Detail Human-Caused Ocean Acidification

A team of scientists has published the most comprehensive picture yet of how acidity levels vary across the world’s oceans.