Tag: hurricanes

September 12th, 2018|

Why Hurricane Florence is Unusual and Dangerous

Chia-Ying Lee, a Climate and Life Fellow, and other Columbia scientists explain why it’s difficult to predict exactly how strong, or intense, Hurricane Florence will be.

January 19th, 2018|

Breaking New Ground in Hurricane Modeling

Researchers create first model for hurricane hazard assessment that is both open source and capable of accounting for climate change. They hope the new system will lead to storm risk and hazard assessments for major cities.

January 10th, 2018|

Chia-Ying Lee: Improving Tropical Cyclone Risk Assessment

Center for Climate and Life Fellow Chia-Ying Lee is examining how wind field asymmetries and variability impact tropical cyclone risk and how these can be included in risk models.

September 12th, 2017|

Could Climate Change Breed a Whole New Category of Hurricane?

Hoaxes have been calling Irma a Category 6 hurricane, but there’s no such thing. Could there be, in the future?

September 6th, 2017|

Video: Climate Change and Hurricane Harvey

Atmospheric scientists Chia-Ying Lee and Adam Sobel explain that climate change didn’t cause Hurricane Harvey, but it likely made the storm worse.

September 5th, 2017|

How Will Scientists Find Out Whether Climate Change Made Hurricane Harvey Worse?

It’s too soon to say there’s a connection, but searching for the fingerprints of climate change shouldn’t take too long.

August 25th, 2017|

How Did Hurricane Harvey Become So Powerful, So Quickly?

Over the past day and a half, Hurricane Harvey’s winds have quickened from about 35 to 109 miles per hour. What’s driving this massive power-up?

June 12th, 2017|

Adam Sobel: Preparing for the Next Big Storm

Superstorm Sandy was a wake-up call for a lot of people in New York City, including Adam Sobel, who’s spent more than two decades studying the physics of weather and climate.

February 1st, 2016|

Without the Montreal Protocol, More Intense Tropical Cyclones

Using computer models, scientists compared our expected future with a scenario in which ozone-depleting substances had never been regulated.