Tag: paleoclimate

November 17th, 2017|

Center for Climate and Life Fellow Featured in National Geographic

A reporter from National Geographic joined paleoclimatologist Billy D’Andrea and his colleagues for an expedition to gather vital climate data in the Norwegian Arctic.

October 31st, 2017|

In Biblical Land, Searching for Droughts Past and Future

The landlocked are surrounding the Dead Sea suffered long megadroughts in the past. Now, climate change threatens to inflict such conditions again on this already sere, volatile region.

October 5th, 2017|

Ancient Humans Left Africa to Escape Drying Climate, Says Study

Humans migrated out of Africa to escape a drying climate, about 60,000 years ago, according to a new study in the journal Geology.

September 26th, 2017|

Climate Change: Some Lessons From the Vikings

Billy D’Andrea’s research on the experiences of the Vikings may provide a kind of object lesson on how changing climate can affect civilizations.

June 8th, 2017|

I Don’t Have Time for Despair. I’m Too Busy Doing Science.

Self-pity is a luxury we can’t afford right now. We need science to inform our actions in a fast-changing world, and we need to keep asking questions.

May 31st, 2017|

Expect the Wet to Get Wetter, and the Dry, Drier

As the world warms due to climate change, shifts in global distribution of rainfall can be expected, impacting water resources across the planet.

May 19th, 2017|

Photo Essay: Coring Arctic Lakes to Study Vikings

Billy D’Andrea is investigating the relationship between environmental change and characteristics of early settlements in Arctic Norway.

April 17th, 2017|

Finding Changing Landscapes Through a Microscope

Pratigya Polissar, a paleoclimatologist and Center for Climate and Life Fellow, talks about his research, and what inspired him to go into his field.

February 9th, 2017|

Indonesian Corals Shed Light on Climate System

A new coral salinity record shows that the most significant hydroclimatic feature in the Southern Hemisphere influences a major Pacific Ocean current.

January 18th, 2017|

Green Sahara’s Ancient Rainfall Regime Revealed

Rainfall patterns in the Sahara during the six-thousand-year “Green Sahara” period have been revealed by analyzing marine sediments.

November 4th, 2016|

Clues to Past Climate

A close-up of a Litsea calicarioides leaf’s stomata, through which leaves take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen, speaks to atmospheric CO2 levels 23 million years ago.

November 1st, 2016|

How Far Did Sea Level Rise in the Past?

Figuring out how far sea level rose during past warm periods in Earth’s history starts with a walk on the beach, a keen eye for evidence of ancient shorelines, and a highly accurate GPS system.

June 14th, 2016|

New Support for Human Evolution in Grasslands

A new study supplies the longest and most complete record of ancient plant life in much of what is now Ethiopia and Kenya, the assumed birthplace of humanity.

December 3rd, 2015|

What Is Ocean Acidification & Why Does It Matter?

As excess carbon dioxide is absorbed into the oceans, it is starting to have profound effects on marine life, from oysters to tiny snails at the base of the food chain.

November 28th, 2015|

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory: Milestones in Climate Studies

Much of the modern understanding of climate has been shaped by pioneering studies done at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

The former site of Sant Roma de Sau as water levels drop in Spain. (Josep Enric/CC-BY-2.0)
November 6th, 2015|

New Drought Atlas Maps 2,000 Years of Climate in Europe

Using tree rings, a new drought atlas maps the reach and severity of dry and wet periods across Europe and the Mediterranean over the past 2,000 years.

Greenland Ice Sheet (NASA-GSFC)
October 13th, 2015|

Tracking Ice Sheets When They Were Smaller than Today

As global temperatures rise, knowing just how far Greenland’s ice sheet shrank in the past could help scientists predict sea level rise in the future.

A new study projects that much of Ethiopia, Somalia and Djibouti in the Horn of Africa will grow drier as global warming progresses. In northern Ethiopia, herders often already struggle to make a living. (Brian Kahn/IRI)
October 9th, 2015|

Horn of Africa Drying in Sync with Climate

A new study finds that the Horn of Africa is drying at a rate that is both unusual in the context of the past 2,000 years and in step with human-influenced warming.

Changing pollen levels in the sediment of Lake Elsinore indicate that a series of mega-droughts gripped the region thousands of years ago. Photo by Jim Sneddon/CC-BY-2.0
September 22nd, 2015|

Ancient Pollen Points to Mega-Droughts in California Thousands of Years Ago

Ancient pollen is providing new insights into historic droughts in Southern California, including how a series of mega-droughts that changed the ecological landscape.

Researchers sample a dead tree in northern Mongolia. (Courtesy Nicole Davi)
June 11th, 2015|

Tree Rings Confirm Unprecedented Warming in Central Asia

A new study of tree rings from Mongolia dating back more than 1,000 years confirms that recent warming in central Asia has no parallel in any known record.

Drought map in 2095 under business as usual. (NASA)
February 12th, 2015|

Warming Pushes Western U.S. Toward Driest Period in 1,000 Years

During the second half of the 21st century, the U.S. Southwest and Great Plains will face drought worse than anything seen in times ancient or modern, a new study says.